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Birds In Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Birds Of Bwindi Forest

Birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park make it a superb destination for birding safaris in Uganda a must-be on every birder’s itinerary.

There’re over 350 birds in Bwindi national park, where 14 are endemic including the rare African green broadbill.

The Bwindi impenetrable forest holds 23 Albertine rift endemic birds (90% of the Albertine rift endemics). These include;

  • The Blue-headed sunbird,
  • Handsome francolin
  • Rwenzori turaco
  • Purple-breasted sunbird
  • Shelley’s Crimsonwing
  • Regal sunbird
  • Red-faced woodland warbler
  • Rwenzori batis
  • Mountain masked Apalis
  • Red-faced woodland warbler, etc.

The majority of Uganda birding safaris in Bwindi take place in the Buhoma sector, for example, along the Buhoma waterfall trail, the River Ivi trail, in the bamboo zone, and also in the Mubwindi swamp of the Ruhija sector, particularly in the early morning hours.

On a birding trail in Bwindi forest, you’re likely to see some of the park’s 10 primate species, including the Black and white colobus monkeys, Blue monkeys, Red-tailed, and L’Hoest’s monkeys, as well as several butterfly species and the unique flora.

Below Are The Most Sought-After Birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

  1. African Green Broadbill

Also called the Grauer’s broadbill, the African green broadbill is one of the endemic Birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. It is a nice-looking species of bird in the family of Eurylaimidae.

It’s an exceptional dumpy green flycatcher-like broadbill with a buffy crown, a black eye stripe, and a powder-blue throat and vent.

It’s a scarce bird species, usually spotted singly or in pairs around 1760- 2500m altitude preferring the edges of clearings.

While on your Uganda birding tour in Bwindi national park, it can be spotted in the Mubwindi swamp of the Ruhija sector usually, early in the morning.

  1. Green Broadbill

Also known as the lesser green broadbill, the Green broadbill is a spectacular shining green bird with an unusual umbrella-like head shape, commonly found in lowland forests.

Males have black wingbars plus a dark spot behind the eyes while females are paler green plain with no dark markings.

It can be spotted in the Buhoma sector along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Handsome Francolin

A handsome spurfowl is a beautiful terrestrial forest bird species in the pheasant family Phasianidae.

It has a dark reddish brown plumage, grey head, red bill and legs, brown iris, bare red skin around the eyes and rufous grey below.

It’s commonly found around forest edges bamboo zones, and also along roads and paths.

They’re usually spotted in pairs or groups, especially early morning or late in the afternoon.

Though similar to the Scaly francolin, it’s larger and richer brown, with red bare skin around the eye. It can be spotted while on nature walks in the Buhoma sector.

  1. Black Bee-Eater

A black bee-eater is a colourful species of bird in the Meropidae family and one the most common Birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park.

This colourful bee-eater mostly dwells at the edges of rainforests and in secondary woodlands.

It appears entirely black from a distance but, in good light, it features a scarlet throat, blue eyebrow, blue belly, blue under the tail, and chest spots.

On your birding Uganda safari in the impenetrable forest, it can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Cinnamon-Chested Bee-Eater

The cinnamon-chested bee-eater is a medium-sized colourful bird with rich rufous underparts.

It has a vivid green head, upper parts, and tail while the chin and throat are yellow, separated by the black strike from the cinnamon-brown breast that darkens towards the belly.

Their tail base is yellow and has a white tip on the blackish tail when seen from the front.

They’re commonly spotted in small groups resting high in visible places.

Though similar to the Little and Blue-breasted bee-eaters, they’re much bigger and more richly coloured below. You can spot them while on nature walks in the Buhoma sector.

  1. Black Collared Apalis

The black-collared Apalis is a handsome species of bird in the family Cisticolidae.

It’s a slim lovely long-tailed bird with grey upperparts and mostly white underparts with a black chest band, and rufous flanks.

Though similar to the Rwenzori Apalis, it’s distinguished by its white rather than buffy throat.

It’s commonly spotted around the forest edges, usually in pairs or small flocks and can be spotted along the River Ivi trail.

  1. Mountain Masked Apalis

Also known as the Black-faced Apalis, a Mountain masked Apalis is a spectacular bird species in the family Cisticolidae, native to the Albertine Rift montane forests.

It’s a lovely black-hooded and green-backed Apalis having a white spot on the neck side, usually spotted in pairs.

It mostly prefers the upper half of the forest but, it sometimes feeds lower.

It’s much similar to the Masked Apalis but, it’s mostly black-headed and has a white dot rather than a stripe on the neck side, and is found at higher elevations.

They can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Blue-Headed Sunbird

A blue-headed sunbird is a gorgeous species of bird in the family Nectariniidae endemic to Albertine rift montane forests.

It’s a beautiful medium-sized sunbird having a vivid blue head and breasts plus yellow shoulder tufts though, often hidden. Please, note the incredible red eye. Both sexes are similar but females are duller.

Males are similar to the male green-headed sunbirds but, have red eyes and are darker overall. It can be spotted in the Mubwindi swamp area.

  1. Regal Sunbird

A regal sunbird is a colourful species of sunbird in the family Nectariniidae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests.

Males have bright green upper parts, and dark wings and tails plus a vivid yellow, red breast, and belly. The females are dull brownish.

Males are distinct, identified from other sunbirds by the yellow underparts while females are much similar to the female Double-collared sunbirds but, paler and more yellowish.

It can be spotted along the Buhoma River trail.

  1. Bar-Tailed Trogon

The bar-tailed trogon is a fine-looking green-and-red trogon species of the family Trogonidae.

It has yellow feet and a bill plus heavily striped black and white under the tail.

It’s commonly spotted singly or in pairs mostly along the Buhoma waterfall trail in the Buhoma region. It can be distinguished from other African trogons by its barred tail.

  1. Dusky Crimsonwing

A dusky Crimsonwing is a small impressive dark bird species of the waxbill family.

It has a red back and face while the wings and tail are black.

The underparts are dark grey. Both sexes are similar though, males have more red on the face and juveniles lack red on the face.

It’s endemic to Albertine rift montane forests and is usually spotted on forest edges, in pairs or in small groups.

It can be spotted in the Buhoma sector along the Buhoma waterfall trail or the Ivi river trail.

  1. Shelley’s Crimsonwing

Shelley’s Crimsonwing is a lovely vulnerable scarce bird species of the estrildid finch, endemic to Albertine rift forests.

It’s a vividly coloured bird species that commonly dwell in closed canopy, usually in lush valley bottom nigh water.

Males have a bright red crown, face and back, with contrasting black wings and tail, plus olive-yellow underparts with warmer tones on flanks and bellies.

Females are duller with an olive head and some red on the mantle and rump. Note the vivid red bill in all sexes. If lucky, it can be potted in Mubwindi swamp fringes.

  1. Double-Toothed Barbet

A double-toothed barbet is a beautiful bird species in the family Lybiidae.

This colourful barbet is unmistakable due to its lovely black and red colouring plus a huge ivory-coloured bill and yellow skin around the eyes.

This pretty barbet is black on the top side of its body with a patch of white feathers on its back. Its breast is red, with a white patch on its side.

Though comparable to the black-breasted barbet, it has a red chest. On your birding safari in Uganda Bwindi forest, it can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Yellow-Rumped Tinkerbird

The yellow-rumped tinkerbird is a small striking black-and-white barbet in the family Lybiidae.

This spectacular bird is identified by its vivid yellow rump and bold white stripes on the face which vary geographically.

Though similar to the Yellow-throated tinkerbird, its facial marking is white and lacks a yellow throat.

On your Uganda tour in Bwindi national park, you can be spotted on nature walks in the Buhoma region.

  1. Western Tinker Bird

A western tinkerbird is a lovely and unique African barbet native to Central Africa, living at altitudes from 900- 3,030m.

This little tinkerbird is identified by its yellow stripe along the back from the crown to the rump. It also has a white moustache stripe and strong yellow marks on the wings.

It can be spotted on nature walks along the 14km River Ivi trail.

  1. Kivu Ground Thrush

The Kivu ground thrush is a spectacular scarce bird native to the Albertine rift montane forests, considered a subspecies of the Abyssinian ground thrush.

Adults have a deep rufous orange on the head plus a distinctive face with a colourful white eye ring.

They’re less rufous on the breast and flanks while the upper parts are olive-brown except for the orange-brown rump and tail.

On a folded wing, it has two distinctive white wing bars from the tips to the coverts.

Though it’s rare, it can be spotted in Buhoma birding trails, usually in the early morning hours.

  1. African Emerald Cuckoo

An African emerald cuckoo is an eye-catching species of cuckoo native to Africa.

Males have a vivid green back and head with a yellow breasts while females are striped green and brown on their backs and have green and white on their breasts.

On your Uganda safari tour in Bwindi impenetrable forest, it can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. African Green Pigeon

An African green pigeon is an attractive species of bird in the family Columbidae. Adults have maroon patches on top of their wings and the juveniles have olive colour.

Their upper parts are greyish-green to yellowish-green and have yellow thighs. Their bill and feet are red with the bill having a white tip.

They’re mostly found in nomadic groups in fruiting trees and can be spotted on a nature walk along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Pin-Tailed Whydah

A pin-tailed whydah is a small attractive songbird with an exclusive pennant-like tail in breeding males. Males are easily noticed by their black back and crown, plus a very long black tail.

Their wings are dark brown with white patches and have white underparts plus a short orange-pink bill.

Females lack a long tail extension, they’ve streaked brown upperparts, white underparts with buff flanks, and a buff black face pattern but, they hold an orange-pink bill.

They can be spotted in the Mubwindi swamp zone.

  1. Rwenzori Nightjar

The Rwenzori nightjar is a unique nocturnal Albertine rift endemic bird. It’s quite a darker night jar growing to a length of about 23cm.

It has a tawny, blackish or chocolate brown-speckled plumage.

Males have white spots on their four main primaries and the outer edge of the tail is white while females have buff-coloured spots on their primaries and a little white on the tail.

They’re spotted in forest clearings and edges, grasslands, cultivation, and moorland. If lucky, you can encounter it in the Buhoma sector.

  1. The Red-Headed Bluebill

The red-headed bluebill is an eye-catching common species of estrildid finch, a member of the wax bill family.

Males have a black belly while females have a spotted one, and all sexes have a redhead plus a massive conical red and blue bill.

They’re commonly spotted in pairs or small flocks, in areas with thick undergrowth sometimes along roads and paths.

They resemble Grant’s bluebill but, are identified by the all-red head.

Males are similar to the male Black-bellied seed cracker however, have a black tail plus a red-and-blue rather than a plain blue bill. They can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Purple-Breasted Sunbird

The purple-breasted sunbird is a spectacular long, slim medium-sized sunbird, endemic to the Albertine rift forests.

Breeding males display a range of vivid colours in good light and have long thin tails year-round while females have dark faces and pale throats.

It’s a bit similar to the Bronze sunbird but, males are identified by their longer tails and in breeding plumage by their purple tones.

Females are recognised by their more pointed tails and lack of pale eyebrows.

They’re usually uncommon however, with a skilled guide, they can be spotted in the Buhoma region.

  1. Neumann’s Warbler

Also known as the short-tailed warbler, a Neumann’s warbler is a lovely unusual small bird species in the family Cettiidae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests.

This divine bird is unmistakable due to its marks: the bold black, white, and olive-green stripes on its large head.

It’s usually spotted in the middle canopy of montane forest, around thick and wet areas e.g. along streams.

It’s similar to Green Hylia but, it’s shorter-tailed.  Though it’s scarce, you can spot it with the help of a skilled guide along the Buhoma waterfall and River Ivi trails.

  1. Rwenzori Batis

The Rwenzori batis is a colourful black and white batis, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests, inhabiting altitudes of 1,340- 3,300m.

It has a black broad chest band plus a white slash across the wing. Males have yellow eyes while females are orange.

They’re mostly found in pairs, especially in the bamboo zone.

It’s similar to Ituri batis but, found at higher elevations, and identified by its broader black band across the breast. It can be spotted in the bamboo zone while on the Bamboo trail.

  1. Doherty’s Bush-Shrike

A Doherty’s bush shrike is a spectacular bird having a greenback and a dazzling red throat and forehead, a yellow belly, plus a black chest band. It’s mostly spotted in undergrowth forests.

While on your Uganda safari in Bwindi Impenetrable NP, this impressive bird can be spotted along Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Rwenzori Turaco

The Rwenzori turaco is an eye-catching multi-coloured turaco in the family Musophagidae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests and one of the most famous birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park.

Just like other turacos, this lovely turaco also shows large crimson wing patches in flight and amazingly bounces through trees.

They’re mostly spotted in pairs or small groups. It can be spotted also along Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Red-Faced Woodland Warbler

A red-faced woodland warbler is a colourful unique woodland warbler of the family Phylloscopidae, endemic to Albertine rift montane forests.

This stunning small warbler has green upper parts, a distinctive reddish face and throat plus a white belly and rump. Just like other woodland warblers, it’s so active and always on a move.

It’s identical to the Brown woodland warbler, but paler on the belly, with more red on the face and throat. It can be spotted while on nature walks in Buhoma sector with the help of our expert local guide.

  1. Red-Throated Alethe

The red-throated alethe is a gorgeous scarce species of bird in the family Muscicapidae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests.

It’s a dark chunky robin-like bird with a bright brown back and tail, a grey chest, plus a white belly. Please, also note the grey eyebrow and reddish throat. It’s a fairly shy bird and commonly dwells on the forest floor.

Though it’s similar to the Brown-chested Alethe, it’s identified easily by its reddish throat.

With a help of a local skilled guide, it can be spotted in the Buhoma region for example, along the Buhoma waterfall trail and Ivi river trail.

  1. Strange Weaver

The strange weaver is a lovely scarce species of bird in the family Ploceidae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests.

This spectacular unusual weaver has a black head, a dark olive-green back, plus a yellow belly. Males have a chestnut patch on the breast and in females, it extends onto the throat.

It’s usually spotted in pairs in the understory creeping through thick vegetation.

Though confused with the Forest weaver, it’s identified by its olive black back and by chestnut on the breast. It can be spotted in the Buhoma expanse with the help of our local senior guide.

  1. Chapin’s Flycatcher

The Chapin’s flycatcher is a lovely scarce dull flycatcher, endemic in Albertine rift montane forests.

This gorgeous bird has a grey-brown plumage on the back and is fairly paler below.

In a good view, a short pale line above the bill is visible.

It’s usually spotted in the middle canopy of the forest

Though a little similar to the African dusky flycatcher, it’s slightly larger and not streaked on the underparts and identified from other flycatchers by its plainness.

It can be spotted in the Buhoma region on guided nature walks.

  1. Ross’s Turaco

The Ross’s turaco is a beautiful African bird in the turaco family- Musophagidae. It’s an eye-catching purple turaco with a yellow bill and face plus a puffy red crest.

It shows colourful large crimson wing patches while in flight.

It’s mostly found along forest edges and in woodlands. It can be spotted while on nature walks along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Black-Billed Turaco

A black-billed turaco is a pretty medium-sized green crested turaco. Adults are similar to the Green turaco however, they’re differentiated by their small all-black bill and rounded whitish crest.

Just like other turacos, it also shows large crimson wing patches while in flight.

It can be spotted on nature walks in the Buhoma sector and also possible along River Ivi trail.

  1. Many-Coloured Bush-Shrike

The Many-coloured bush shrike is an eye-catching shrike with several colours that vary from the breast: black, yellow, orange, red, or buff.

Males have a black mask through the eye while females have a grey one. It’s very similar to the Black-fronted bushshrike however, they don’t overlap in range.

This spectacular bird can be spotted while on nature walks in the Buhoma sector.

  1. Giant Kingfisher

Amazingly, the giant kingfisher is the largest kingfisher species in Africa (42- 46cm long). It’s easily identified by its large bushy crest, a large black bill and fine white spots on the black upper parts.

Males have a chestnut breast band while females have a white-spotted black breast band and a chestnut belly.

On your Uganda birding safari adventure in Bwindi, you can spot it around Lake Mutanda which is just near the Rushaga sector.

  1. White-Throated Greenbul

Also called the white-throated bulbul, the white-throated greenbul is a lovely species of songbird in the bulbul family.

It’s a small and relatively long-billed greenbul, usually spotted around forest edges singly or in multi-flock species flipping its wings and tail as it moves through the vegetation.

Its underparts are yellowish while the upper parts (back and wings) are grey-green. It has a white throat, pale eyes and a grey face.

It can be spotted along the Buhoma waterfall trail.

  1. Montane Oriole

The mountain oriole is a beautiful bird species of the family Oriolidae, commonly found in tropical moist montane forests.

The mountain oriole has a distinctive yellow plumage, a black hood, plus a red bill.

They’re usually spotted in groups but, sometimes join other flocks of other bird species.

This lovely bird can be spotted on guided nature walks in the Buhoma region for example, along the Buhoma waterfall trail or River Ivi trail.

  1. Stripe-Breasted Tit

The stripe-breasted tit is un usual spectacular bird species in the family Paridae, endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests.

It’s a colourful tit with a black, white and grey pattern. It has a black hood that continues as a dark stripe down the centre of the underparts plus white edgings on much of the wing and the outer tail.

In Bwindi, they can be spotted in the Mubwindi swamp of the Ruhija region, usually in pairs and sometimes can join other flock species.

  1. Archer’s Robin-Chat

The Archer’s robin chat is a beautiful fairly plain brown-and-orange robin chat with a white eyebrow and a dark face.

They are endemic to Albertine rift montane forests.

Unlike a typical robin chat, its tail is entirely orange.

It’s commonly spotted in the understory forest, usually near streams.

Though a little similar to the white-bellied robin chat, it’s separated by the orange belly, much bolder white eyebrow plus an all-orange tail.

It can be spotted within the Buhoma area with the help of our expert local guide.

  1. Yellow-Eyed Black Flycatcher

A yellow-eyed black flycatcher is a lovely small and long-tailed black flycatcher with pale yellow eyes.

They are endemic to the Albertine rift montane forests mostly spotted singly or in pairs around forest edges, perched out on visible tree branches.

It’s separated from other similar blackbirds by its pale eye.

It can be spotted with the help of our skilled local guide in the Buhoma area.

  1. Common Bulbul

The common bulbul is a lovely unmistakable thrush-sized brown bird with a darker face and throat. Their belly is pale and the undertail is white or yellow in some species.

It’s usually spotted in small flocks and not easily missed due to its noisy and repetitive powerful song. They’re commonly spotted while on gorilla trekking in Bwindi.

  1. White-Tailed Blue Flycatcher

The White-tailed blue flycatcher is a colourful slim and slightly crested bird with a long amazing tail that’s usually fanned. It has a vivid blue back, pale grey underparts, plus a white outer tail.

It resembles an African blue flycatcher but, is easily identified by its white outer fanned tail. It can be spotted in the Buhoma region while on nature walks.

  1. Brown-Capped Weaver

A brown-capped weaver is a rare eye-catching black and yellow weaver in the family Ploceidae.

Males are brown-capped while females are black and all sexes have a dazzling yellow patch on the back.

They’re found commonly in pairs and small groups, though sometimes can join other species.

This lovely weaver feeds by creeping on tree limbs like a nuthatch.

It’s a little similar to the Preuss’s and Yellow-capped weavers however, males are separated by their brown caps, and females by their all-black heads.

You can spot them in the Buhoma sector.

  1. Yellow-Fronted Canary

A yellow-fronted canary is a common spectacular gregarious seedeater in the finch family.

Males have a green back, brown wings and tails.

Their underparts, rump, and head are yellow with a grey crown and nape and a black malar stripe.

Females are similar, however, have a weaker head pattern and are duller.

They’re mostly spotted in flocks with other species in grassy areas and bush areas.

You can spot them in the Buhoma sector on most of the birding trails.

  1. African Broadbill

Also known as the black-capped broadbill, the African broadbill is a lovely small, chunky, brown-and-white bird, showing a broad bill when seen from below.

Males have a black dark crown while females are grey.

They have olive-brown upper parts with black stripes while feathers on the lower back and rump are white, hidden while resting.

The underparts are creamy-white with black bands on the flanks and the breast.

They’re usually spotted in flocks of a tight circle, and in flight, they make a loud amazing sound by clapping their wings together at a fast speed.

They’re confused with Rufous-sided and Gray-headed broadbills, however, lack rufous on the breast. Can be spotted while on nature walks in the Buhoma region.

  1. Fine-Banded Woodpecker

A fine-banded woodpecker is a nice-looking and quite large green-backed woodpecker.

For those in the eastern range, their underparts and face are covered in fine barring while for those in the west, their face and breast are finely specked, with some larger black markings on the lower belly.

They’re commonly spotted in montane forests.

Though a bit similar to the fine-spotted woodpecker, they’re found in different habitats and lack a red or black stripe on the face, and lack barring in the wing and tail.

It can be spotted on nature walks in the Buhoma area.

  1. Helmeted Guinea Fowl

A helmeted guinea fowl is a beautiful large-bodied and small-headed, slaty-grey game bird perfectly covered in a grey-black plumage spangled with white.

Like other guineafowls, this bird has an unfeathered head, decorated with a dull yellow or reddish bony casque and bare skin with red, blue, or black hues.

Their wings are short and rounded, and their tail is likewise short.

The Crested guineafowl differs from the helmeted guineafowl by having darker plumage and a crest on top of its head. If lucky they can be encountered on the River Ivi trail.

  1. Zebra Waxbill

Also called the orange-breasted waxbill, the zebra waxbill is a colourful tiny short-tailed sparrow-like bird. It has a reddish iris, orange breast, red bill plus dark olive-green plumage.

Males have a red rump, dark bars on the whitish flank plus a red eyebrow stripe while females are duller and smaller than males and lack the male’s red eyebrow.

They’re found mostly in wetlands, often in small flocks. Slightly identical to the Quailfinch but, have yellow underparts and a red rump.

They can be spotted in the Mubwindi swamp.

  1. Black-faced Rufous Warbler

A black-faced rufous warbler is a beautiful unusual forest-dwelling warbler.

The males are mostly rufous while females have olive-grey plumage though, all sexes have a black face mask that goes down the centre of the underparts.

They’re usually spotted in the thick undergrowth forest.

On your Uganda birding tour in Bwindi, it can be spotted in the Buhoma region with the help of our skilled local guide.

Other Birds in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park/Birds of Bwindi Forest

  1. Great blue turaco
  2. Black-and-white-casqued hornbill
  3. Crowned hornbill
  4. Bare-faced go-away-bird
  5. Eastern plantain-eater
  6. White-throated bee-eater
  7. Abyssinian thrush
  8. African thrush
  9. Albertine boubou
  10. Red-headed malimbe
  11. Mountain yellow-warbler
  12. Blue-throated roller
  13. Gray-headed kingfisher
  14. Dwarf honeyguide
  15. Bronze sunbird
  16. Scarlet-chested sunbird
  17. Variable Sunbird
  18. Northern double-collared sunbird
  19. Green-throated sunbird
  20. Blue-headed sunbird
  21. Speckled pigeon
  22. Afep pigeon
  23. Rameron pigeon
  24. Bronze-naped pigeon
  25. White-naped pigeon
  26. Red-eyed dove
  27. Tambourine dove
  28. Ring-necked dove
  29. Senegal coucal
  30. Blue-headed coucal
  31. White-browed coucal
  32. Black coucal
  33. Blue malkoha
  34. Pied Cuckoo
  35. Yellow-throated Cuckoo
  36. Dideric cuckoo
  37. Dusky long-tailed cuckoo
  38. Barred long-tailed cuckoo
  39. Black cuckoo
  40. Red-chested Cuckoo
  41. African cuckoo
  42. Black-shouldered nightjar
  43. Rwenzori nightjar
  44. Rwenzori batis
  45. White-spotted flufftail
  46. Buff-spotted flufftail
  47. Red-chested flufftail
  48. Speckled mousebird
  49. Blue-naped mousebird
  50. African wood wool
  51. Fraser’s eagle-owl
  52. White-browed crombec
  53. African blue flycatcher
  54. African paradise flycatcher
  55. Yellow-eyed black flycatcher
  56. Grauer’s warbler
  57. African blue Apalis
  58. Mountain yellow warbler
  59. Crowned hornbill
  60. Black-faced Warbler
  61. Chestnut-throated Apalis
  62. African black duck
  63. African harrier hawk
  64. Pied crow
  65. White-necked raven
  66. Hammerkops
  67. African black duck
  68. African sacred ibis
  69. Grey cuckoo-shrike
  70. African wood owl
  71. Black sooty flycatcher
  72. Grey cuckoo-shrike
  73. Shelly’s greenbul
  74. Yellow-streaked greenbul
  75. White-bellied robin-chat
  76. Grauer’s rush warbler
  77. Red-fronted ant pecker
  78. White-tailed ant thrush
  79. White-headed woodhoopoe
  80. Red-capped robin-chat
  81. Snowy-crowned robin-chat
  82. Grey-winged robin-chat
  83. White-browed robin-chat
  84. Dusky twin spot
  85. Ticape wagtail
  86. Mountain Wagtail
  87. Tambourine dove
  88. Spotted wood dove
  89. Grey-cheeked hornbill
  90. African rail
  91. Crested francolin
  92. Ring-necked francolin
  93. Scaly francolin
  94. Red-necked francolin
  95. Shelley’s greenbul
  96. Slender-billed greenbul
  97. Honeyguide greenbul
  98. Little greenbul
  99. Sharpe’s starling
  100. Narrow-tailed starling

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